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Drinking Science Vermouth Wine

How Long Does Vermouth Last?

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Reader Evan asks (in a nutshell):  Does vermouth go bad?

Grab that bottle of vermouth that’s been sitting open in your liquor cabinet for a year and take a sip. Yeah, it goes bad. Real bad. Vermouth is basically just wine, after all.

But how long does it last after you open it? Conventional wisdom is all over the map, so I put the question to the experts at Noilly Prat. Their answer: After opening a bottle of vermouth it should be stored in the fridge, where it will keep for about three months.

There ya go. Here’s an idea: Replace your vermouth whenever you replace your fridge deodorizers.

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Summary
How Long Does Vermouth Last?
Article Name
How Long Does Vermouth Last?
Description
Once opened, vermouth can be stored in the refrigerator for about three months.
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Drinkhacker
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Christopher Null

Christopher Null is the founder and editor in chief of Drinkhacker. A veteran writer and journalist, he also operates Null Media, a bespoke content company.

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22 Comments

  1. Blair Frodelius January 21, 2009

    I refrigerate all my vermouth, tequila, mezcal, port, sherry, and mixers. I also keep my vodka and gin in the freezer, just to have it icy cold when making martinis.

    Reply
  2. Christopher Null January 21, 2009

    Do you have room for food in there? BTW there is no need to keep higher-proof spirits like tequila refrigerated (they never go “bad”)… unless you just like to keep them cold.

    Reply
  3. Edoc January 21, 2009

    I’m (mostly) with Blair. I keep my gin and vodka in the freezer, so there’s no need to shake them in ice to make martinis. I keep lower proof liquers and cordials in the refrigerator (e.g. St. Germain and Cherry Heering).

    Reply
    1. Anonymous November 5, 2017

      Traditionally, youre actually never supposed to shake martinis. They’re a stirred drink (all of the ingredients are booze, therefore – stir). Secondly, stirring the gin with ice helps to dilute the drink and incorporate it more with the other ingredients. (Yes, it is meant to be diluted just a tad). Dont freeze your gin or vodka please!!

  4. Blair Frodelius January 22, 2009

    I own a small dorm sized fridge which is dedicated to cocktail ingredients. The only “food” items are cocktail onions, horseradish (for bloody marys), and any herbs (mint, borage, thyme, etc.)

    Also forgot to mention I keep things like X-Rated and Hpnotiq in there too. They tend to ferment once opened.

    Reply
  5. Henderpete April 15, 2009

    Unless you drink them straight, keeping vodka or gin in the freezer makes no sense. Stirred or shaken, a civilized martinis needs the water absorbed from the ice in the shaker and if the liquor is already at freezing temperatures you will not achieve the necessary dilution. I’ve found that one hundred stirs using room temperature gin is perfect for a 6 to 1 martini.

    I’m looking forward to the new Noilly Prat although I’ve been more than happy with the old formula for 50 years. Never tried the Lillet.

    Reply
  6. Tim September 25, 2009

    The new Noilly Prat is a sweet formula. I highly recommend Vya X-Dry for your martinis. Dolin Rouge is a good red.

    Reply
  7. Anonymous October 16, 2009

    How long will an UN-OPENED bottle of Martini & Rossi Extra Dry Vermouth last. I know there probably isn’t any defining answer but I’d love some best guesses. Thanks

    Reply
  8. Anonymous March 2, 2010

    this small bottle of Martini Rossi Asti belongs to my 85yr old mum, she has had it in her fridge for years, yes, years. it has never been opened, but she has now remembered it and would like to drink it, will it still be safe for her to have, thanks

    Reply
  9. Christopher Null March 2, 2010

    Anon – It will almost certainly be safe but will probably not taste very good. Splurge on the 5 bucks for a new bottle for Mum.

    Reply
  10. Bar Bill February 5, 2011

    Perhaps you can answer my question. I have some decades-old bottles of Dubonnet blanc that were until recently unopened. It makes *awesome* martinis. It also tastes very little like new Dubonnet blanc. What gives?

    Reply
    1. Heather October 16, 2017

      How long can dubonnetbe saved prior to oopening

  11. DAVID April 10, 2015

    I HAVE AN UNOPENED BOTTLE OF NOILLY PRAT VERMOUTH THAT HAS BEEN STORED IN A CABINET FOR ABOUT 20 YEARS AT AROUND 65F. IS IT STILL GOOD? IF I OPEN IT NOW WILL THE TASTE HAVE BEEN AFFECTED?

    Reply
    1. Christopher Null April 10, 2015

      It will have almost certainly gone bad by now. I would open it just for kicks though, but prepare for the worst.

  12. Gracie May 22, 2015

    I have a bottle of Martini and Rossi vermouthe from 1975 [inherited from a friend]; it has never been opened – is it still good to drink?

    Reply
    1. Christopher Null May 22, 2015

      Undoubtedly not.

  13. Ver September 22, 2015

    I HAVE A BOTTLE OF 1963 MARTINI AND ROSSI DRY VERMOUTH! IT IS UNOPENED AS FAR AS I CAN TELL (SOMEBODY MAY HAVE OPENED IT AT SOME POINT AND HAD A LITTLE SIP). CAN I DRINK IT? WILL IT BE GOOD/BAD/DEADLY? THANK YOU (SORRY ABOUT THE ALL CAPS MY CAPSLOCK BUTTON IS BROKEN)

    Reply
    1. Christopher Null September 22, 2015

      Almost certainly completely undrinkable (though likely harmless).

  14. mary January 27, 2016

    ha ha ha I have a bottle that is at least 50 years old. Thanks for giving me the courage to chuck it!

    Reply
  15. NSH July 13, 2016

    Hi !
    I have three bottles of unopened MARTINI AND ROSSI DRY VERMOUTH from an office bond -themed party two years ago. Any chance we can still use it?
    Thanks!

    Reply
  16. Lady Barkeep October 29, 2016

    Martini and Rossi is pretty cheap stuff, no matter the age of the bottle. It isn’t meant to age like a fine vintage port. Toss it if it’s been sitting around awhile and spring a few extra bones for a better quality vermouth – Noilly Prat, Vya, Dolin, just to name a few. Your Martinis and Manhattans will thank you.

    Reply

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